Why Is My No-Fault Divorce So Difficult?

Many people in the state of Mississippi, as in other areas of the country, seek to finalize and dissolve their marriage under what is commonly termed a no-fault divorce, also known as irreconcilable differences divorce in legal terms. No-fault divorces offer a variety of benefits for a prospective client, including that they are less expensive and less stressful than going through all of the arguing and fighting that accompany fault-based divorces and the lawsuits that are necessary in order to obtain a fault-based divorce.

As we’ve discussed many times on this website, and as is known by the majority of the legal community, fault divorces require the filing of a traditional lawsuit against your spouse. Many people wonder “why is it that my no fault divorce seems to be so difficult?” In short, no-fault divorce really has nothing to do with whether or not one of the parties or both have committed wrongdoing during the course of the marriage. No-fault divorces exist only when both parties have a clear agreement as to all of the issues involved in the divorce. When the parties have a child or children, own property, or have established separate living arrangements will complicate matters. No-fault divorces become less and less likely when more issues are involved. It is usually our recommendation that in a scenario where both the husband and the wife own little or no property, a no-fault divorce is easily attainable and should be pursued.

It is important, however, to note that in instances where there is not a firm agreement on all issues, a no-fault divorce is not an option. If the payment of attorney’s fees, alimony, whether or not one party wishes to stay in the house with the objection of the other, the visitation schedule of the children, or the possession and payment of automobiles or expenses related to any property owned by the couple is not agreed to, fault divorce is needed.

I’ve practiced domestic law for in excess of thirteen years, and have realized that there are several scenarios where the parties are very close to an agreement; however there are a few sticking points that have precluded them from reaching some final resolution to the dissolving of their marriage. Always remember that it is cost effective to agree on terms of divorce, but this is more easily said than done.

My general recommendation would be that if you are close to an agreement but have not yet obtained one with your spouse, make a short list of the issues that you do agree on prior to contacting an attorney. If you are able to make a list of the things that you do agree on and have very few things left over that could be resolved with a minimal amount of effort, you are on the path to a no-fault divorce. If the filing of a lawsuit against your partner is necessary, you will spend a significant amount of money that can go toward a better use, such as the support of your minor children or the sustenance of your daily living expenses. It is likely that you will need to contact an attorney at some point in order to get some advice about whether or not your divorce is in fact a no-fault or irreconcilable differences matter. If you are able to make some accommodation with your spouse in terms of resolving the major issues, it seems that likely that you will be able to obtain a no-fault divorce with minor adjustments to any initial draft of your agreement with your spouse. Don’t try to win every battle, just win the ones that matter most.

If you are seeking advice as to whether or not a no-fault, or “I.D.” divorce is attainable in your current scenario, we’re best equipped to provide you with assistance in making that determination and advising you as to the best path moving forward. Please feel free to call us for a no-cost telephonic consultation any time at 601-573-7429.
Law Office of Matthew Poole.

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