Posts Tagged ‘question’

Questions for Your Attorney? Ask Them!

Thursday, December 21st, 2017

A lawsuit can be a confusing process for someone who has never been involved in one. They involve a language totally different than the everyday vocabulary of most people. Attorneys usually expect questions from clients because of the large amounts of questions they themselves had at the outset of their career. Divorce lawsuits are especially stressful, as they delve deep into some of the most well-guarded areas of a person’s life. Knowing what questions to ask your attorney can help very much in cutting that stress down, and to help you make sure your case is in good hands. Here are some examples of questions you should be discussing with your attorney.

Question #1: Have you issued discovery, and what did that discovery request?

Discovery is the part of the lawsuit where attorneys send requests for information to the opposing side to be answered. This often involves interrogatories, which are questions about the case to be answered, and requests for production of documents that may be used as evidence at trial. Discovery is an extremely important part of a lawsuit, as it gives a party the time to possibly object to some requests and to carefully build their case. Asking about the issuance and substance of discovery is a way for you to make sure that the attorney you hired is taking the right steps to build your case.

Question #2: What was included in the pleading?

Pleadings are how you ask the court for the relief you want, and therefore should be done with care and should include every remedy possible. For example, there are twelve grounds for divorce in Mississippi. Asking questions about those grounds can help your attorney know what grounds you may have, which will therefore help in crafting the best pleading possible for your case. It’s your story, so help your attorney tell it.

Question #3: What witnesses should I call to help my case?

The answer to this question from an attorney will most likely be “it depends.” Witnesses may testify to things they have personally seen or heard as well as things told to them. You know better than anyone the people in your life who may be able to help present your case, and your attorney’s past experience may help in discovering other potential witnesses as well. One witness’s testimony can be a huge difference-maker in a domestic case.

Question #4: What documentary evidence should I produce?

One question our office receives from clients almost without exception is “What do you need from me?” This often depends on what the other side asks you to produce. In domestic litigation, common documents requested involve finances and contact between a party and their spouse or child. Your attorney should know what document requests you can object to and which ones you will most likely need to produce to the opposing side. These documents will be the foundation of your case, and you should ask your attorney their plan for building that foundation.

Question #5: What things specific to my case can we ask the court to order?

Every situation in domestic litigation is different, as the experiences, wants and needs of different families intersect in each case. You should be asking your attorney what you could possibly ask the court to order that helps you in your situation. The attorney’s role in this is twofold: the attorney should have a basic idea of what the court will or won’t order while also offering a less emotional presence making the request. When a decision affects your family, you want to make sure it is the right one.

Your attorney’s role in your lawsuit is to help you navigate the rules and procedures of a lawsuit, and asking questions can help you give your attorney all the help they need in building your case, as well as making sure your attorney is properly representing you. Lawyers expect those questions, so ask them! Many lawyers will either know the answer, or admit that they don’t and will find you the answer. In lawsuits, the right questions can be the difference between a good result or a bad one. If you have questions about your domestic case, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole. We will be glad to help you in any way possible.