Posts Tagged ‘Mississippi family law attorney’

Corporal Punishment vs. Child Abuse: A Thin Line

Wednesday, August 1st, 2018

Can your child be taken away because of a simple spanking? When I was elementary school at a public institution in Rankin County, Mississippi, I had the misfortune of enduring the school principal’s penchant for enforcing rules by use of a very large paddle, equipped with golf-ball sized holes in order to increase the velocity of each collision. In the early 1990’s, it was standard fare to expect a good old-fashioned whipping from school administration for playground roughhousing or any other number of youthful misdeeds. Boy, how times have changed.

In today’s world of political correctness and fear of legal liability, it seems that those days are long gone, and will likely never return. Parents have often asked our office whether or not a Youth Court or Chancery Court has the authority to take their children from their physical custody wherein there has been significant corporal punishment. Gone are the days of schools bruising the rear-end of a miscreant child (usually boys, alas).

Desoto County, Mississippi recently dealt with an appeal revolving around the question of distinguishing between reasonable discipline versus child abuse, and the line is very thin and broadly within the discretion of the trial court in civil matters. In this particular instance, the appellate court had to consider the sufficiency of evidence utilized by the trial court in removing four children from their father’s custody. At hand was a simple query, at least at first glance.

The appellate court first, and a matter of proper judicial due course, considered the bare language of the applicable Mississippi statute, section 43-21-105(m). In pertinent part, said statute provides that an abused child is one “whose parent….has caused or allowed to be caused, upon the child… emotional abuse, mental injury, non-accidental physical injury or other maltreatment”. Wow, talk about a broad definition, allowing wide discretion for the judge. However, the statute on point also states that “physical discipline, including spanking, performed on a child by a parent, guardian or custodian in a reasonable manner shall not be deemed abuse under this section”. Thanks for the semi-clarification, right?

It seems to me that the question of whether or not corporal punish ment of a child is violative of Mississippi law comes down to good old-fashioned common sense. While the criminal statutes regarding abuse of minors are relatively easy to interpret, the civil law remains open to broad interpretation. It is my hunch that any physical punishment that is accompanied by bruising or other visible signature will likely run afoul of the statute on point, but the margin for interpretation is razor-thin. Foremost, always remember that the court will have wide leeway in drawing the line between abuse and reasonable corporal punishment. No two judges are the same and may see the same thing differently. Reasonable minds may, and will often, disagree.

If you are dealing with allegations of abuse or neglect and need guidance and effective legal counsel, we will gladly be of assistance. Always trust your better judgment and recognize that any child punishment of a child must not be done out of anger. In the words of the American author and Unitarian minister Robert Fulgham, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten”. Well said.

Matthew Poole is a Jackson, Mississippi family lawyer focused on case evaluation and domestic conflict management. He was admitted to the Mississippi Bar in July, 2004.

Through the Eyes of a Child; Divorce Life Lessons

Friday, July 20th, 2018

It is all too common that we forget the smallest things in life, sometimes to our detriment. More often than not, forgetting the simple is counter-productive. Going through a divorce, it is usually the best path forward to revert to the basic that you know with certainty. Attempting to preserve your marriage requires the same thinking.

When Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, arguably the best basketball player, if not athlete of all time, was inducted into the Hall of Fame, he spoke true words of wisdom. When asked by a nationally renowned reporter, “What made you so successful?”, the great said simply, “I just try to do the little things right. To most people it seems like small stuff, but it often makes the difference between winning and losing”. Well said.

We’ve written so many articles about the best approach to get a fair and just result when going through a divorce. We decided it would be refreshing to write on a related topic; a topic intended to assist people in preserving their marriage. This may have lifelong implications for children and is so important to our society. And yes, we are aware of the irony of the article as written by a divorce lawyer.

It is absolutely fundamental that we must work to recognize the concept that Robert Fulgham advanced in his famous book, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten”. It is necessary to our happiness as well as the well-being of those we care about that we remember the lessons learned as children, and some of them are so simple that they are easily forgotten; be nice to others, don’t hit people, remember to pick up after yourself, work hard, pay attention, and the list goes on as such. These are such simple concepts that in our everyday lives their importance often gets lost in the clutter. That is a true tragedy.

So many adults could bring happiness to not only themselves but their spouse, who is a reflection of themself, and also most importantly to their children by simply remembering the lessons we learned so many years ago.

My office regularly receives calls from prospective divorcees seeking information as to how to obtain a divorce. It is amazing to me that so many people will have failed to even have a discussion with their spouse about whether or not a divorce is a good idea for either spouse. It is my firm belief that this world would be such a better place if we considered others’ feelings, our childrens’ well-being, and the happiness of the one we married as a paramount concern. They are too easily forgotten and brushed aside.

If I may leave you with a simple piece of modest wisdom, ask yourself if you have fulfilled your marital vows, if you have considered your children’s future thoroughly before even contemplating severing the bonds you made in matrimony. Ask yourself through the eyes of a child. If you have truly exhausted all possibilities and are still unhappy in your marriage, you may have very well earned your way out of a bad place. If my office can help you receive justice and fairness as a last resort in the severance of your marriage, give us a call.

Matthew Poole is a Jackson, Mississippi family attorney who is focused on the preservation of fairness and justice and the best interests of children. He was admitted to practice in 2004.

Child Custody Modification: What Does It Take?

Monday, October 2nd, 2017

Child custody arrangements are almost never easy to deal with, legally or emotionally. They become increasingly complex when one parent decides they deserve more time with the child. Modifications of child custody are long, stressful and expensive. You can probably imagine why, as the living arrangements of a child have a large impact on their development, and therefore courts prefer to leave no stone unturned in deciding on the best situation. Unfortunately, many times a parent is not granted custody because the court has some reservation about that parent’s ability to raise a child. The flip side of that coin is that people can change, sometimes for the better. When a parent who has lost custody improves their situation in some way, it may be natural to believe they are entitled to a modification of child custody. While this is certainly a factor, there are others at play in the court’s decision.

Proving a positive change in the non-custodial parent’s life can often be the easy part of a modification case. In order for child custody to be modified, the non-custodial parent must prove there has been a substantial change in the circumstances affecting the child, the change has adversely affected the child’s welfare, and that a change in custody is in the best interests of the child. Johnson v. Gray, 859 So.2d 1006, 1013 (Miss. 2003). Improvement in the condition of the non-custodial parent does not justify making a change. Touchstone v. Touchstone, 682 So.2d 374, 377 (Miss. 1996).

This is where child custody modifications become the complicated cases they can be. The non-custodial parent could have very well improved an area of their life that the court felt was a concern, but if there has been no adverse change in the custodial parent, a modification of custody will probably not be successful. Therefore, the burden of proof for a non-custodial parent in a child modification case is twofold. The non-custodial parent must show that something has changed with the other parent that has negatively affected the child while also proving that a change in custody over to them serves the best interests of the child. This is quite a high burden to meet, which adds into the stress and expense of these kinds of cases.

Choosing which parent gets more time watching a child grow up is not a fun process, and it can be a difficult thing for parents to hear. Our office believes that child custody should never be dealt with lightly, and that Mississippians deserve to know their options going into a modification case. If you believe you are entitled to a modification of your custody arrangement, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole. We have the knowledge of the law regarding child custody modifications to make you feel confident in our legal services, and we also have a great passion for helping children and parents be together as much as possible. Call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole at 601-573-7429.

Separate Maintenance/Alimony Considered by Court of Appeals

Monday, August 29th, 2016

Recently the Rankin County Chancery Court was appealed on a claim by a wife for separate maintenance which is also considered separate alimony.  The claims of the wife include the issue of her being entitled to support outside of child support, which would be considered alimony or temporary separate maintenance.  The Rankin County Chancery Court heard a case in Spotswood v. Spotswood wherein the court was asked to consider a claim that the husband was required to reimburse the wife for insurance premiums that she paid through her employment and that she would also request payments for the mortgage of the marital home that the husband and wife owned jointly.  The Rankin County Chancery Court determined that the husband reimburse the wife for those insurance premiums as well as pay half of mortgage payments for the marital home, although the husband had departed the marital home.  The husband argued that the chancery court made an error in ordering him to make payments on the marital home as well as the insurance payments and essentially granted the wife’s request for separate maintenance or alimony even though the court specifically found that the wife was not entitled to the payment for separate maintenance or alimony.  The Court of Appeals determined, after reviewing the entire record, that if the lower court had found that the award of separate maintenance or alimony is not warranted then the court cannot order one spouse, in this case the husband, to undertake obligations for the benefit of the other spouse, in this case the wife.  Essentially the Court of Appeals was presented with a question that has been litigated in Chancery Courts around the state of Mississippi for decades.  The Court of Appeals resolved a solitary issue here and found that the wife was not entitled to separate alimony or maintenance because the court of Rankin County determined that she was not entitled to the same.  The court, in essence, determined that the husband was not required to make the payment for the mortgage of the home or insurance, as the Rankin County Court had previously adjudicated.  Therefore the Court of Appeals reversed and rendered the decision back to Rankin County Chancery Court in order to have them make a determination of the issues aside from the decision that was made; that the husband could not be required to make payments outside of the scope of alimony even if they were in the guise of insurance or mortgage payments after the determination had already been made that separate alimony or maintenance during the parties’ separation was denied.


If you need assistance with a separate maintenance or alimony issue, contact The Law Office of Matthew Poole, and we are best able to provide you with the assistance and advice in order to bring your case to a fair conclusion.

Matthew Poole (601) 573-7429.

Alternating Physical Custody of a Young Child

Sunday, August 21st, 2016

It has become common in the state of Mississippi, as well as other jurisdictions, that parties to a divorce as well as custody actions have requested that their minor child be as close to equally split in physical custody as the court will permit. On the day of the trial in a recent case that went to the court of appeals, the husband and wife agreed to consent to trial of the divorce on solely irreconcilable differences and permit the chancellor to resolve the issues of physical and legal custody of the minor child of the marriage. At the time of this marital dissolution the parties were jointly parenting a five-year-old little girl. After hearing evidence based upon the testimony of the parties excluding the fault-based grounds that were dropped ,the parties were both awarded approximately an equal split on physical custody until the daughter was able to attend kindergarten. The wife argued that the chancellor mistakenly failed to decide who would have custody of the daughter when she started kindergarten. The wife did not argue that the final order of the court was not final and appealable, but the underlying issue to be resolved was the parallel to this issue. In his ruling, the chancellor failed to specify the exact month and year in the final judgment of the child’s reversion to standard physical custody on the part of the mother. The wife also argued to the court of appeals that the chancellor failed to consider if the joint custody arrangement was practical due to the distance the daughter had to travel. At this point, the father lived in San Antonio, Texas. There was a significant argument as to the impracticality of traveling to San Antonio, Texas from Brandon, Mississippi, even prior to the child starting kindergarten at 5 years old. In this case, the chancellor found that shared custody was in the best interest of the child, despite the fact that she would have to travel significantly to spend time with either parent. Given the distance between San Antonio, Texas and Brandon, Mississippi, the court of appeals determined that the custody arrangement was not in the best interest of the minor child. Thus, the case was reversed and remanded with further instructions to the court to make adequate consideration of the travel time in order to effectuate this difficult provision in terms of travel for alternating custody. The important point to remember is that a significant amount of precedent discourages the use of alternating custody arrangements even prior to a child attending school.

If you need help with a complicated or complex custody arrangement or need advice on how to best proceed in order to parent your child or children, call the Law Office of Matthew Poole, and we will be happy to help in any way that we can within the bounds of existing legal precedent.

Matthew Poole (601) 573-7429.

“Can Parental Alienation of Children result in Contempt of Court?” – A Summary Prepared by Matthew Poole, Jackson, Mississippi Child Custody Attorney

Sunday, May 15th, 2016

Although some states recognize parental alienation as a separate cause of action without the need for showing direct contempt of a court order, Mississippi Law has yet to directly correlate parental alienation with the laws that require compliance to the strict terms of the judgment of the court. It is well accepted that contempt of a Mississippi court order regarding visitation, custody, or support is based upon a standard that has been clear precedent for decades. In general, contempt of a court order can be shown by demonstrating; 1. The presence of a lawful valid court order, 2. A violation of that court order, 3. That the violation was willful or “contumacious”. Violations of court orders are common place throughout every jurisdiction, however, without a showing of contumacy there can be no holding by any Mississippi Chancery jurisdiction that contempt is present. Contempt has traditionally been held as a disregard of or disobedience to the rules or orders of a judicial body by disorderly behavior so as to disturb the proceedings or impair the respect to that judicial body. The normal sanction for contempt is either monetary sanction or incarceration until the contemnor has complied with the court order and thus purged themselves of contempt.

It is common that court orders regarding child custody, whether by agreement or after a trial, include language that prohibits disparagement to the children of either parent. It is also well held law that modification of custody may be based upon substantial interference with visitation or extreme interference with either party’s parental relationships with their children. Interestingly, a violation of a non-disparagement clause in a court order has also been held also to warrant modification of custody, visitation, or any of the terms of visitation. In order to obtain a modification of physical custody, there must be a showing that the disparagement of one parent to the child has an adverse impact on the child. There have been several cases in MS where children have exhibited of high levels of anxiety and depression that has been linked to the disparagement and conflict between the parents.

It is highly recommended that in any divorce or child custody proceeding that a non-disparagement clause be explicit since there is no direct recognition of alienation syndrome in MS. Without specific language in the court order prohibiting such conduct it is likely that disparagement will not be held to be contumacious and will solely be potential ground for modification of custody or visitation. Keep in mind that a showing of contempt requires far less proof than seeking modification of any prior court order.

If you would like to schedule a consultation with a MS family law attorney with extensive experience in these matters, call Matthew Poole at 601.573.7429. We practice primarily in Hinds, Rankin, and Madison County, Mississippi but also cover any county in Mississippi.

Although some states recognize parental alienation as a separate cause of action without the need for showing direct contempt of a court order, Mississippi Law has yet to directly correlate parental alienation with the laws that require compliance to the strict terms of the judgment of the court. It is well accepted that contempt of a Mississippi court order regarding visitation, custody, or support is based upon a standard that has been clear precedent for decades. In general, contempt of a court order can be shown by demonstrating; 1. The presence of a lawful valid court order, 2. A violation of that court order, 3. That the violation was willful or “contumacious”. Violations of court orders are common place throughout every jurisdiction, however, without a showing of contumacy there can be no holding by any Mississippi Chancery jurisdiction that contempt is present. Contempt has traditionally been held as a disregard of or disobedience to the rules or orders of a judicial body by disorderly behavior so as to disturb the proceedings or impair the respect to that judicial body. The normal sanction for contempt is either monetary sanction or incarceration until the contemnor has complied with the court order and thus purged themselves of contempt.

It is common that court orders regarding child custody, whether by agreement or after a trial, include language that prohibits disparagement to the children of either parent. It is also well held law that modification of custody may be based upon substantial interference with visitation or extreme interference with either party’s parental relationships with their children. Interestingly, a violation of a non-disparagement clause in a court order has also been held also to warrant modification of custody, visitation, or any of the terms of visitation. In order to obtain a modification of physical custody, there must be a showing that the disparagement of one parent to the child has an adverse impact on the child. There have been several cases in MS where children have exhibited of high levels of anxiety and depression that has been linked to the disparagement and conflict between the parents.

It is highly recommended that in any divorce or child custody proceeding that a non-disparagement clause be explicit since there is no direct recognition of alienation syndrome in MS. Without specific language in the court order prohibiting such conduct it is likely that disparagement will not be held to be contumacious and will solely be potential ground for modification of custody or visitation. Keep in mind that a showing of contempt requires far less proof than seeking modification of any prior court order.

If you would like to schedule a consultation with a MS family law attorney with extensive experience in these matters, call Matthew Poole at 601.573.7429. We practice primarily in Hinds, Rankin, and Madison County, Mississippi but also cover any county in Mississippi.

Mississippi Family Law Attorney Discusses Same Sex Adoption

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

Now that marriage equality is the law, same-sex couples in Mississippi are beginning to focus on another area in which they are presently on unequal footing with heterosexual couples. Mississippi is currently the only state where same-sex couples are expressly prohibited from adopting children. This prohibition on adoption is the subject of a federal class-action lawsuit that is being brought by same-sex couples against the state of Mississippi.

The lawsuit challenging the ban on adoption by homosexual couples is based upon a constitutional argument that is similar to the argument that was presented in the recent successful lawsuit that challenged the validity of the prohibition of same-sex marriages. That argument is that the law is unconstitutional because it discriminates against people on the basis of sexual orientation.

Interestingly enough, the ban on same-sex adoption was not the law in Mississippi until fairly recently, in 2000. Perhaps even more interestingly, some of the people who were instrumental in getting the ban signed into law now regret having done so, such as Ronnie Musgrove, who was the governor of Mississippi at the time that prohibition on same-sex adoptions became official.

The ban on adoption by same-sex couples affects many different children. Of course, there are children who are available for adoption through adoption agencies and the like. There are also children in Mississippi’s failing foster care system who are in desperate need of safe and loving homes who are unable to be adopted by homosexual couples. In fact, same-sex couples cannot even provide foster homes for children on a short-term basis because the Mississippi Department of Human Services will not permit them to become foster parents. Mississippi law says that single people and married couples can become foster parents, so same-sex couples may be able to become foster parents if they get married first.

There are many children both in the foster care system and outside of it who are available for adoption and who need safe and loving homes. There are also many same-sex couples in Mississippi who are willing and able to adopt these children if the law would permit them to do so. There are also children who have entered the foster care system after being kicked out of their family homes because they are LGBT. Some foster parents are unwilling to care for LGBT kids, and since same-sex parents are unable to adopt, there is an entire group of children whose needs for safety, acceptance, support, and stability are not being met.

There are also families who are affected by the adoption ban because many same-sex couples are raising children even though they cannot adopt them. Many of the parents in these families do not have the custodial or parental rights that biological or adoptive parents have, which causes problems with everyday activities like signing kids up for sports programs, giving permission to go on school field trips, and seeking emergency medical treatment.

The ban on same-sex adoption is one way in which the state’s policies regarding sexual orientation can affect child custody cases. If you are involved in a child custody case, your Mississippi Child Custody Attorney can help you to understand legal issues regarding sexual orientation in the context of your case. If you need legal support regarding your Mississippi child custody case, contact Mississippi Family Law Attorney Matthew S. Poole today, at (601) 573-7429 to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Mississippi Family Law Attorney Says Parents who Fail to Pay Child Support May go to Jail

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015

There are many types of parents in Mississippi. Unfortunately, one type of parent that exists in Mississippi (as they do everywhere else) is the parent who believes that they can avoid their child support obligations indefinitely without eventually encountering harsh consequences. A couple of recent incidents in Mississippi show that this is simply not true. These incidents show that parents who don’t pay child support may eventually be sentenced to jail.

An Ohio man was recently given a five year sentence in Forrest County as the result of his failure to pay child support. In addition to paying over fifty thousand dollars in back child support, he must serve two years of his sentence in prison, with the remaining three years to be served on supervised probation. This particular incident also illustrates that the State of Mississippi is capable of locating parents outside of the state and holding them accountable for their failure to pay child support.

Another man fled the scene of a traffic stop because he was afraid that he would be arrested for failing to pay child support. There was a warrant out for the man’s arrest at the time that officers attempted to stop his vehicle. At first, the man did not stop his vehicle. When the man eventually stopped and exited the vehicle, he ran into a thickly wooded area in an attempt to evade law enforcement officers.

When child custody cases are resolved by settlement or through court proceedings, a child support order is often part of the outcome. In some cases, parents waive child support because they agree that since both of them share time with the children evenly, their child-related expenses are roughly equal. However, most child custody cases do involve some form of child support calculation and order. Once this order is in place, it can only be changed if a substantial and unanticipated change occurs that affects the paying parent’s ability to meet their child support obligation while still being able to meet their own needs for food, shelter, and the like. These changes, called modifications, are best pursued with the aid of a Mississippi child custody attorney.

Your child support obligation is just that – a legal obligation. If you are a parent who has been ordered to pay child support and you are having trouble paying child support according to the order, it is important that you contact a Mississippi Family Law Attorney right away. An attorney can help you understand more about your child support obligation, including possible consequences of nonpayment. Your attorney may also be able to help you explore options that could temporarily or permanently change the terms of your child support obligation. If you have questions about child support as it pertains to your Mississippi child custody case, Mississippi Family Law Attorney Matthew S. Poole may be able to help you. Please call our office today, at (601) 573-7429, to set up a free consultation.

 

Mississippi Family Law Attorney Says Single Dads are Not Uncommon

Friday, July 10th, 2015

In Mississippi, there are more children who are being raised in single-parent households than there are being raised by married parents. Approximately two out of every three kids in Mississippi are being raised by single parents. While many single-parent households in Mississippi belong to mothers, there are plenty of single fathers here, too.

Unfortunately, even as the number of single dads continues to rise, society is slow to acknowledge and accept the changing face of the single-parent household. There are nine times as many single dads in America right now as there were in the 1960’s. Part of the reason that people may be slow to catch on to the fact that there are more single dads now then there ever were before is that some people hold onto a traditional view of child-rearing as something that is done mainly by a child’s mother.

This traditional view has proven to be problematic because it has created additional challenges for single fathers, who are already working hard to navigate the ins and outs of their kids on their own. Many single dads report that they notice that other people, including fellow parents, teachers, coaches, and co-workers seem to regard them with a mixture of disbelief and disapproval.

Sometimes, both single fathers and their children feel left out because of the way that other people treat them. Children are not always kind to one another, and children of single fathers are sometimes singled out and picked on because their family situation is different than what many kids are used to. The views of other parents on the subject of single fatherhood can get in the way of single dads and their kids enjoying certain activities together. For example, hosting sleepover parties can prove difficult because parents are often reluctant to let their daughters spend the night at a home where there are no adult females present.

Fortunately, although society as a whole is not as accepting of single fathers as it could be, the legal system in Mississippi recognizes that fathers are just as capable of mothers of raising their children, even on their own. An increasing body of Mississippi case law supports custody decisions that serve the best interest of the child, regardless of whether that means that custody goes to the mother, the father, or it is shared equally between both parents. The criteria by which a court determines the best interest of the child in Mississippi consists of a group of factors called the “Albright Factors”. The application of the Albright Factors in multiple court decisions has shown that they do not favor one gender over another.

If you are a father who is seeking custody of your children, you need a strong advocate who can help you present your very best case to the family court. If you have questions or concerns about a Mississippi child custody case, Mississippi Family Law Attorney Matthew S. Poole may be able to help you. Please call my office today, at (601) 573-7429 today, to schedule a free, initial consultation.

Mississippi Family Law Attorney Discusses False CPS Accusations

Sunday, June 7th, 2015

Cases that involve child custody are never easy. Whether you are involved in a divorce or some other matter, you may feel as though your child custody case is one of the most difficult if not the most difficult situation that you have ever been through. As difficult as child custody cases are, they can become even more so if a false accusation of child abuse or neglect gets tossed into the mix.

Sometimes, there is a legitimate reason for Child Protective Services (CPS) to become involved in a child custody matter. Unfortunately, not all matters in which CPS seeks to intervene involve situations in which children are actually being abused or neglected. In some cases, CPS becomes involved by investigating allegations of child abuse or neglect that are eventually proven false. Of course, while the investigation is ongoing, the parent who has been falsely accused may be restricted in their abilities to see or spend time with their children. As you might imagine, this is extremely painful, for both the parent and the children. The accused parent may also experience judgmental treatment from others and being ostracized within their family and community due to the allegations that have been brought against them.

If you have been falsely accused of abusing or neglecting one or more of your children, you may wonder what you should do about it. The most important thing that you can do is, unfortunately, very difficult to do. Remaining calm and keeping a positive, respectful, and cooperative attitude can help the investigators find the truth of the matter as quickly as possible. As angry as you may feel on the inside, it is important that you find a way to address those feelings in some way so that they do not impact your ability to guide the investigation to its correct conclusion. Some people find it helpful to acknowledge their angry feelings by talking through things with a trusted friend, family member, or therapist. Others find that journaling, exercise, time spent outdoors, or solitude helps them to regain their composure in the face of something that would make even the most peaceful and even-tempered person lose their cool.

When your rights to parent your children are at stake because of false allegations of child abuse or neglect, it is important to retain a Mississippi Family Law Attorney immediately, if you have not done so already. If you do have an attorney, call them right away and let them know what has happened. Your attorney can provide you with valuable guidance on what to expect, what to do, and how they can help you to address the false allegations and get your child custody case back on the right track.

False allegations of child abuse or neglect can become important material in your child custody case, because they speak to the character of the person who made the false accusations. Your attitude and behavior throughout the investigation will also be detailed in any reports regarding the matter, so it can also be said that the manner in which you respond to the false allegations also becomes an important consideration in your child custody case.

If you have been falsely accused of abusing or neglecting your child, Mississippi Family Law Attorney Matthew S. Poole can help you. Please call my office today, at (601) 573-7429 today, to schedule a free, initial consultation.