Posts Tagged ‘legal’

Constructive Desertion: When You Just Know

Monday, September 11th, 2017

This is the way the world ends. Not with a bang but a whimper.” T.S. Eliot’s words from his poem “The Hollow Men” can unfortunately describe the end to many marriages. Mississippi law states that desertion of a marriage may act as grounds for a divorce, but the statutory desertion period is one year. When that time period has not been met but there are signs the marriage is ending, courts look to constructive desertion to entitle a party to a divorce. Constructive desertion has been defined by Mississippi courts as conduct that renders the continuance of the marriage unendurable or dangerous to life, health or safety. Benson v. Benson, 608 So.2d 709 (Miss. 1992).

In Benson, the trial court did not grant the parties a divorce on the grounds of cruel and inhuman treatment. The husband alleged that the wife had committed cruel and inhuman treatment by habitual ill-founded accusations, threats and malicious sarcasm, insults and verbal abuse. The trial court found that the martial problems were mostly based on the incompatibility of the parties, which is not a ground for divorce in Mississippi. The Court of Appeals found that the trial court had correctly denied a divorce on cruel and inhuman treatment, but remanded the case for the ground of constructive desertion.

As you can tell by that standard used by the courts, constructive desertion can take many forms. What makes a marriage “unendurable” is different for different people. Mississippi courts have held that inexcusable, long-continued refusal of sexual relations warrants a divorce on the ground of constructive desertion. Tedford v. Tedford, 856 So.2d 753 (2003). As silly as that may sound to some people, this could signal that two spouses have basically become roommates, and the marriage has therefore been deserted.

This conduct may also stem from monetary support issues. If a husband has the means and ability to support his wife, and negligently or willfully does not, then the wife will be justified in severing the marital relationship and leaving the home. If the husband still refuses to support her, then he will be guilty of constructive desertion even though the wife left the house. Deen v. Deen, 856 So.2d 736 (Miss. Ct. App. 2003).

As dramatic as divorces often are, sometimes their end comes with a whimper and not a bang. Sometimes, you just know a marriage has no chance of lasting. Constructive desertion is a ground that many spouses in Mississippi can use to leave a marriage that has not yet reached the statutory time requirement. If you or someone you know is in a marriage that meets the criteria of being unendurable for a reasonable person, or if the person’s life, health or safety is in danger, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole. Our office is experienced in courts throughout Mississippi with our full time and energy dedicated to domestic matters. This allows our office to know the nuances of the law, and to provide you with your best representation. Call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole today at 601-573-7429.

What does “custody” really mean?

Wednesday, July 19th, 2017

You’ve probably heard it before: “I have full custody of my kids” or “I have legal custody” or “He has physical custody of the children” or “We have joint custody of our child.” All those mixing of terms can make child custody confusing, but it shouldn’t be. Child custody in Mississippi is awarded in two ways – “legally” and “physically” – and can be combined in a number of ways to fit the best interest of the child.

Legal custody” pertains to the rights bestowed upon a parent to make decisions of health, education and welfare of the child. “Physical custody” describes the time a child resides with a parent. When parents use “joint custody” to describe their custody arrangements then the court has granted both parents shared rights of custody either physically or legally or both. Generally, parents with “joint physical custody” equally share physical custody of their child and it is exercised every other week. “Joint legal custody” means the parents share in the significant (i.e., not whether the child needs a band-aid) health, education and welfare decision making of the child, regardless of which parent has physical custody of the child at the time decisions are made. The right to share all of the child’s official records is presumed and paramount. Parents might share joint legal custody while one parent has physical custody or parents could share joint physical custody while one parent has legal custody. It should be noted that good communication between parents is paramount to the court’s consideration of whether joint legal custody is in the best interest of the child. Even if the court determines that both parents are equally capable of making legal decisions in the best interest of the child, poor communication between the parents typically results in the Chancellor arbitrarily designating one parent as the sole legal guardian of the child.

Each child custody case is different as evidenced by the many combinations of legal and physical custody, however all custody cases are decided using the same polestar determinant: What is in the best of interest of the Child?

If you or someone you love has questions about their child custody issues then schedule a consultation with the Attorney Matthew S. Poole. Matthew has over a decade of experience representing parents in divorces where child custody is the central issue and in child custody modifications.