Posts Tagged ‘husband’

Frontline Prospective On Child Custody Law

Friday, April 13th, 2018

Working under Matthew Poole, a saying that I hear almost every day in the office is: “if everyone was reasonable, child custody lawyers would be out of a job.” As the main individual who handles calls to our office, I can tell you from first-hand experience that this is true. Working in a family law office can definitely show you the bad side of good people, and the people that call our office are usually in situations where tempers and emotions are high. As the person in our office who handles the majority of these calls, my perspective is that there are things that people can and should do to both save money and to help their situation in the long run.

From the start of my employment here, I noticed some commonalities between the variety of different calls we would receive on a daily basis. The main commonality in every call that we have received is lack of communication between the potential client and the person they are having issues with. If I could give any advice to those in these situations it would be that communication is key. There are so many situations where if the two people could just put differences aside and start a conversation with one another, it would save them so much heartache and money. After an extensive case study on custody matters, our office has found that 25% of people agree to settle their case with the same agreement that was offered to begin with. This shows that if the two people could just communicate without getting attorneys involved, they would not waste thousands of dollars on litigation; giving them more money to spend on the child.

I understand that communicating in situations like divorce and child custody can be tough. But in those circumstances, particularly when children are involved, being able to talk to the other side is vital. For instance, being able to have an open dialogue with the other parent in a child custody case can and will make it easier to deal with them later on down the road. Even though it’s hard, it would be so beneficial for the children if their parents were able to talk and communicate with each other about the children’s needs. It’s not easy for someone going through something like this to shelf their emotions and be the first one to reach out and start a dialogue, but in all honestly it is the best course of action to resolve their issue. To put it simply, every dollar spent on a lawyer could be spent on the kids. Why waste resources on litigation when simple communication could resolve the issue and leave that money available for the child? Doing so would dramatically decrease stress and replace it with tranquility. Just remember, the happier that a parent is, the happier the child will be.

Price is certainly something that most potential clients are sensitive to, and therefore we encourage all of our clients to attempt to talk with the other side as much as possible. Communication can help iron out many of the problems present, and can lower costs greatly for both parties. We understand this can be tough in a situation where there was a falling out of a once caring relationship. Unfortunately, there are times where starting a conversation is next to impossible and getting an attorney involved is the only option. If you believe hiring an attorney is your only avenue of relief, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole. We will do our best for you when communication has broken down in your relationship to get you a fair result.

Written by J. Tyler Cox, J.D. Candidate, Mississippi College School of Law, Class of 2018.

Alimony as Punishment?

Wednesday, March 28th, 2018

Probably the most common misconception about alimony is that it is a punishment for the person who has been ordered to pay it. Some believe that if their spouse has cheated on them, or has engaged in any type of misconduct, that they are entitled to alimony simply based on fault. This is simply not true. Basing alimony wholly on whether the other party is at fault would basically make alimony an award for punitive damages, which is a totally different beast altogether. Although fault is a factor when considering alimony, the main hurdle in any alimony dispute is need.

Punitive damages are damages that exceed simple compensation and are awarded to punish a defendant. Punitive damages do not take into account the need or income of the person being awarded those damages, but rather serve as a warning or discouraging measure to make sure that other people do not engage in similar behavior. For example, punitive damages are commonly used in torts cases where a court punishes a company for a misdeed in order to stop it from doing the misdeed again and to dissuade other parties from doing the same. Punitive damages are responsible for the TV commercials and billboards that speak of large awards won for clients.

The purpose of alimony is to offer support for a spouse who is financially-dependent on the other. Even though fault is a factor that a court will look at, a court will focus primarily on the need of the spouse seeking alimony. In other words, alimony can be awarded to a spouse if that spouse is in need of support because they are not equipped to maintain the level of lifestyle that they have grown accustomed to while being married. For example, if a wife never had a job while married and now is getting a divorce, a court may award her with alimony so that she may begin to get back on her feet since the main income earner in her household is no longer present.

There are four types of alimony:  (1) Periodic Alimony, the more traditional type, with no set termination date and allocated month to month based on need;  (2) Lump Sum Alimony, awarded as a fixed sum that can be paid all at once or in installments;  (3) Rehabilitative alimony, developed to assist a spouse when reentering the workforce after their marriage; and  (4) Reimbursement Alimony, awarded to a spouse who supported the other spouse through undergraduate, graduate, or professional school. A court may award just one type of alimony or a combination of the types.

While alimony and punitive damages may seem the same, they serve two totally different purposes. Punitive damages are a punishment payment made out to the other party, and while people who are ordered to pay alimony may see it as a punishment, alimony is actually just based on the need of the other party. There are two totally different criteria when awarding both punitive damages and alimony. Courts in Mississippi will in fact look at fault when awarding alimony, but only after an intense need-based analysis by the chancellor to determine how much and what type should and will be awarded. Confusing these two are very common among people who come into our office, and we are well equipped to answer any questions that may arise when dealing with these issues. Contact our office if you or anyone you know have any questions about alimony, awarding alimony, or any other questions please do not hesitate to ask.