Posts Tagged ‘disparagement’

Winning and Losing a Custody Case

Friday, December 29th, 2017

The smallest events can have a large significance on the outcome of a situation. A custody lawsuit is no different, as the testimony of one witness or the smallest behavior by a party can be the deciding factor in who gets custody of a child. Our office has had many cases hinge on a seemingly insignificant occurrence or detail. Our office wants our current and future clients to know the impact that things can have on their custody hearing, and what they can do to influence the outcome.

Custody cases are a naturally volatile process, and when you introduce the emotions and concerns that these cases raise, they become even more so. One part that may be hard on the parties is a temporary visitation and custody order that the court puts in place until a trial on the case is heard. Having contact with the other person for exchange of a minor child for visitation can be a tough thing for people to go through, as many former romantic partners harbor some sort of ill will toward each other. Mississippi Courts have held that interference in a parent’s visitation schedule may amount to a material change in circumstances in extreme cases. Ash v. Ash, 622 So.2d 1264, (Miss. 1993). Though it may be difficult, the best thing is to adhere to the court’s order as closely as possible. Court orders are not suggestions, and keeping in line with that order will only help your case.

Another common thing we see in our office is disparagement of one parent by the other. Mississippi courts have held held that, if extreme enough, parental alienation or disparagement can amount to a material change in circumstances that can be enough to award custody to the non-offending parent. Potter v. Greene, 973 So.2d 291, 293 (Miss. Ct. App. 2008). It is natural to want to make your case to both the Court and your child, however that energy is better spent showing the child why they should live with you, and not just why they shouldn’t live with their other parent. These remarks can be very damaging to the relationship between the child and the other parent, as well as to the child themselves.

There is simply no way around it: custody lawsuits are tough. They combine they already stressful process of a lawsuit with decisions that will impact a family’s life for the foreseeable future. Although both parties to these cases care about the welfare of the child, too often their disdain for each other shines brighter than that concern. Our advice is to be careful of your conduct during a custody lawsuit. This is simple advice that when combined with the highly emotional nature of these cases can become difficult to keep in perspective. The other side is just as invested as you are, and if they believe reporting your behavior to the court will help their case, then they will. If you have questions about what to do outside of the courtroom in your custody case, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole, and we will help you in any way we can.