Posts Tagged ‘Court’

Importance of a Father in the Home

Saturday, May 12th, 2018

Maintaining the family unit should be the number one goal of any mother and father. Even when going through a divorce, it is essential that both parents are just as involved in their child’s life as they possible can be. However, with divorce ever on the rise in the United States, an all too common consequence of parent’s separating can be an absence of the father in the home. This can mean a great deal of adversity for the children later on in life. Be it an increased risk of poverty or a higher chance of incarceration, living without a father puts a child’s life squarely at risk for all manner of difficulty.

Since 1960, the percentage of children living in two-parent homes has decreased dramatically from 88% down to 66%. This drop has been caused by many factors, but the most prevalent one is the rise in divorce. Across the nation, married couples are calling it quits and their children are stuck in the middle. Unfortunately, this increase in divorce has made some dads pack up permanently, leaving their ex-wife with the kids, and their kids without a father-figure. This can have an indescribable effect on the life of a child.

According to the Census Bureau, there are 24 million children in the United States, and one out of three of them live without their biological father in the home. Compared to children who live with both parents, these children are four times more likely to live in poverty, and two times more likely to drop out of high school. Combine these statistics with the poverty income level in the U.S. only being $12,140.00 a year, a child living in a single parent, fatherless home has to escape becoming another statistic just to overcome the odds already stacked against them.

Risks of poverty and lack of education aside, there is a darker and more horrifying concern of growing up without a father. One of the more striking statistics provided by the Census Bureau shows that 63% of youth suicides in the United States are performed by children of single-parent homes. This is an astonishing number. To put this data a different way, one of the only single identifying metrics that connects two thirds of all children from around the country that commit suicide is the fact that they are raised in a single-parent home. This alone shows the importance of why maintaining a two-parent household is integral in a child’s life.

Going through a divorce can be the toughest thing someone has to go through. Although most everyone would rather not split up their own family, it is often not that simple. When mom and dad cannot work it out, or even refuse to work it out, the child suffers. Custody battles can be the same way. When one parent refuses to let mom or dad be a part of their kid’s lives, it hurts the child most of all. If you want to be a part of their child’s life, but are struggling because of divorce, custody, or your spouse is refusing your rights as a parent, please do not hesitate to call us. The Law Office of Matthew S. Poole is well-seasoned to handle these types of situations and we would be happy to help.

Written by J. Tyler Cox, J.D., Class of 2018

Parental Alienation: Why You Should Act Fast

Thursday, May 3rd, 2018

Pretty regularly at our office, we unfortunately have child custody cases where one parent continually makes derogatory remarks about the other parent in front of their child. This is one of the worst things a parent can do when wanting to obtain custody, especially when the child is not old enough to legally have a preference with which parent he/she would rather live with. What many parents do not realize is that a parent has an inherent duty to foster and facilitate the relationship between their child and that child’s other parent. Disparaging the other parent can not only hurt their case in the eyes of a chancellor, but it can also adversely affect the child. From a chancellor’s perspective, belittling the other parent in an effort to negatively impact the child’s relationship with them is wholly improper and unacceptable.

When the “brainwashing” of a child by one parent gets so bad that it manipulates the child into disliking or not wanting a relationship with the other parent, there is more than likely a case of parental alienation. Parental alienation is a term used by child custody lawyers and child psychologists alike to describe what happens in situations where a parent has made conscious efforts, by negative words or actions, to upset their child’s relationship with the other parent. An example of this would be where a mother has spoken badly about a father, made derogatory remarks about him, or even lied about him to the child, all in order to alter that child’s feelings towards his dad, so that the child would not want to live with him.

Other examples of behaviors that can cause parental alienation include one parent discussing details of the parent’s relationship, scheduling the child’s activities during the other parent’s visitation time, not informing the other parent the times of those activities in order for them not to attend, denying the other parent important school and medical records, and giving the child ultimatums encouraging them to pick one parent over the other. This type of behavior has major consequences, and if not addressed as soon as possible, can permanently destroy a child’s relationship with their parent. A child’s mind is very susceptible, especially to a person that they instinctively trust – as they would a parent. Prolonged exposure to this type of influence deteriorates little by little any chance of a relationship they might have had with one of their mother or father.

In years past, parental alienation issues could only be brought up when there was a non-disparagement clause in the custody order. This prevented parental alienation from being any more than a contempt issue. Now, however, chancellors in Mississippi consider disparagement through the parenting-skills factor under Albright. With disparagement now being a consideration in Albright, it constitutes a material change sufficient for modification of custody.

Isolating a parent from their child is serious, and in the end, it does more damage to the child than it does to the other parent. To put it plainly, parental alienation is a form of child abuse. Chancellors know this, that is why any hard evidence that a mother or father is molding their child’s emotions negatively toward the other is met with extreme prejudice. Absent neglect and endangerment, nothing can kill a parent’s chances of being awarded custody more than harmfully reshaping their child’s relationship with their mom or dad. If you believe that this is happening to you, or someone you may know, please give us a call. We have the expertise to handle parental alienation cases, and any of your child custody needs.

Matthew Poole is a Jackson, Mississippi domestic attorney who specializes in family litigation. He was admitted to practice in 2004.

Don’t Just Ask for a Restraining Order

Sunday, April 22nd, 2018

Have you been physically assaulted by your spouse or the father (or mother) of your child? Have you contacted the local police and other authorities regarding the abuse? Oftentimes children are the primary victim of their own parents’ hatred of one another. If your children have witnessed one or more incidents of physical abuse, they are likely viewed by Mississippi law as victims of abuse and neglect themselves and have multiple avenues of recourse. While courts with criminal jurisdiction such as Justice Court, County Court, and Municipal Courts are able to provide you with a peace bond or other means of restraining your spouse/opposing parent from the harassment and stalking that so often accompanies domestic abuse, they have severe limitations.

Unfortunately, the separation of powers between the various types of courts in Mississippi can present additional challenges to the actual victims of domestic abuse. Mississippi Chancery Courts are of limited jurisdiction of all matters set forth in §159 of the Mississippi Constitution of 1890. The State of Mississippi is comprised of twenty (20) Chancery Court Districts (see §9-5-3, Mississippi Constitution, 1890). There are six (6) specific subject-matter areas in which Chancery Court exercises exclusive, complete, and ongoing jurisdiction, including “All Matters in Equity” and “Minor’s Business”. “Equity” is an often confusing and misinterpreted term. According to Black’s Law Dictionary (Seventh Ed.), equity has a four part definition, the first two of which are particularly telling as to the depth and breadth of Mississippi Chancery Court subject-matter jurisdiction. First, Black’s asserts that equity is “Fairness, impartiality, evenhanded dealing”. Secondly, It is “The body of principles constituting what is fair and right; natural law”. Clearly equity isn’t a lucid concept, rather a notion that is reflective of available recourse as to principles of justice.

Victims of domestic violence are able to obtain relief from Chancery Court per the procedure set forth in Mississippi Code Annotated §93-21-3 as well as those governed by Mississippi Rule of Civil Procedure 65. As codified, the victim of domestic violence, married or unmarried, may go so far as to award the abused parent possession of the home or to require that the perpetrator provide adequate housing including utilities and other related expenses. Also, Chancellors are empowered by statute to encumber jointly held assets and make adequate provision for the care and support of minor children as well as the victim. Custody of the children, child support, and visitation are all within the realm of properly exercised equitable judicial discretion. Equity permits that Chancellors have broad authority in the spirit of protecting those who cannot protect themselves.

In short, Mississippi Chancery Courts are empowered by legislative proclamation to address a variety of issues that adversely affect children, as they too are considered victims of domestic abuse. Often it is assumed that a court other than Chancery Court is able to afford domestic violence victims some level of redress outside of the scope of a restraining order itself. However, as previously stated, the exclusive nature of Chancery Court jurisdiction as to “Minor’s Business” and “All Matters in Equity” precludes other arms of the judiciary from ordering such relief to victims.

The victim of domestic violence not only is afforded relief in various forms both equitable and by statute, but retains significant advantages in the determination of both temporary and physical custody. Mississippi Code Annotated §93-5-24 provides in pertinent part that;

“there shall be a rebuttable presumption that it is detrimental to the child and not in the best interest (i.e. in regards to the commonly cited Albright v. Albright factors) of the child to be placed in the sole custody, joint legal custody or joint physical custody of a parent who has a history of perpetrating family violence. The court may find a history of perpetrating family violence if the court finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, one (1) incident of family violence that has resulted in serious bodily injury to, or a pattern of family violence against, the party making the allegation or a family household member of either party. The court shall make written findings to document how and why the presumption was or was not triggered. This presumption may only be rebutted by a preponderance of the evidence.”

It is clear that victims, parents and children alike, are afforded significant protections from those who would harm them. Although the presumption that violence perpetrators are not proper custodians or decision-makers for a child may be overcome it presents a sufficiently robust obstacle to those persons who have been restrained, enjoined, or otherwise found civilly liable for home-trauma. To be clear, the ball is not in the abuser’s court. Our office is fully able to address all of the challenges that domestic violence creates.

If you or someone you care about is a domestic violence victim and is in need of an attorney with experience as to the best path forward, my staff and I are ready to provide you with the resources to obtain justice. Our office exclusively handles domestic litigation and is unlike so many other firms who lack the client base to remain focused on these matters. We have 14 years of experience in this sub-category of Mississippi law and the will, desire, and knowledge to ensure that equity will be done.

Matthew Poole is a Jackson, Mississippi domestic attorney who specializes in family litigation. He was admitted to practice in 2004.

Hire a Lawyer… Fast

Wednesday, April 4th, 2018

Getting served with legal papers is not a fun experience. There is really no other way to put it. It doesn’t help that these papers are often served on the person at work to avoid confrontation, which adds to the embarrassment and confusion. However, as stressful as being involved in a lawsuit is, swift action in hiring counsel is an extremely important step in addressing it.

One of the common scenarios given in my first year of Civil Procedure was that clients would be served with papers requiring an answer (30 days in Mississippi), would lay the papers on the counter, and forget about it for 26 days. They would then see the papers while cleaning up and realize that they needed to hire a lawyer. While it may be tempting to try and ignore the fact that you are being sued, you should take fast action to protect your rights to be heard.

In custody actions, the summons is different than one requiring a written answer, and provides the person served with a time and place certain to appear and defend themselves. That hearing is called a temporary hearing, because it outlines the Court’s order on what the parties are to do until trial. This temporary order includes the parameters of visitation with the child as well as the support obligation of the parent who is not exercising primary physical custody. Depending on the space of the court docket, these temporary hearings are usually not set for very far out from the service of the complaint, so that the party bringing the suit can get some temporary relief while awaiting trial.

When you are served with papers such as these, don’t lay them on the counter and forget about them! As Jimmy Two Times would say in the 1990 film Goodfellas, you need to go “get the papers, get the papers.” Get those papers and take them to a lawyer before that temporary hearing date so that you and your attorney can talk about what will be the most effective strategy from there. The sooner you hire a lawyer when you are served with papers, the better. If you are served with custody papers, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole. We have the skills and expertise to make sure the proper strategy is in place before the temporary hearing so as to get you the best result in your case.

Written by J. Tyler Cox, J.D. Candidate of Mississippi College School of Law, 2018.

Alimony as Punishment?

Wednesday, March 28th, 2018

Probably the most common misconception about alimony is that it is a punishment for the person who has been ordered to pay it. Some believe that if their spouse has cheated on them, or has engaged in any type of misconduct, that they are entitled to alimony simply based on fault. This is simply not true. Basing alimony wholly on whether the other party is at fault would basically make alimony an award for punitive damages, which is a totally different beast altogether. Although fault is a factor when considering alimony, the main hurdle in any alimony dispute is need.

Punitive damages are damages that exceed simple compensation and are awarded to punish a defendant. Punitive damages do not take into account the need or income of the person being awarded those damages, but rather serve as a warning or discouraging measure to make sure that other people do not engage in similar behavior. For example, punitive damages are commonly used in torts cases where a court punishes a company for a misdeed in order to stop it from doing the misdeed again and to dissuade other parties from doing the same. Punitive damages are responsible for the TV commercials and billboards that speak of large awards won for clients.

The purpose of alimony is to offer support for a spouse who is financially-dependent on the other. Even though fault is a factor that a court will look at, a court will focus primarily on the need of the spouse seeking alimony. In other words, alimony can be awarded to a spouse if that spouse is in need of support because they are not equipped to maintain the level of lifestyle that they have grown accustomed to while being married. For example, if a wife never had a job while married and now is getting a divorce, a court may award her with alimony so that she may begin to get back on her feet since the main income earner in her household is no longer present.

There are four types of alimony:  (1) Periodic Alimony, the more traditional type, with no set termination date and allocated month to month based on need;  (2) Lump Sum Alimony, awarded as a fixed sum that can be paid all at once or in installments;  (3) Rehabilitative alimony, developed to assist a spouse when reentering the workforce after their marriage; and  (4) Reimbursement Alimony, awarded to a spouse who supported the other spouse through undergraduate, graduate, or professional school. A court may award just one type of alimony or a combination of the types.

While alimony and punitive damages may seem the same, they serve two totally different purposes. Punitive damages are a punishment payment made out to the other party, and while people who are ordered to pay alimony may see it as a punishment, alimony is actually just based on the need of the other party. There are two totally different criteria when awarding both punitive damages and alimony. Courts in Mississippi will in fact look at fault when awarding alimony, but only after an intense need-based analysis by the chancellor to determine how much and what type should and will be awarded. Confusing these two are very common among people who come into our office, and we are well equipped to answer any questions that may arise when dealing with these issues. Contact our office if you or anyone you know have any questions about alimony, awarding alimony, or any other questions please do not hesitate to ask.

Mississippi Custody Factor 3: Parenting Skills

Thursday, February 1st, 2018

Considered by some to be the “smoking gun” in child custody cases, the determination of which parent has the better parenting skills is pivotal in a chancellor’s decision in awarding custody. Before entering our office, many clients feel anxious about the weight of this particular factor because they feel as though they may be singled out as not being able to raise and nurture their child. However, while the determination of which parent has the better parenting skills seems like the most important element in a child custody case, it is only one factor that a chancellor weighs in making their decision, and a factor that could wind up favoring both parents equally.

When weighing this factor, courts look to which parent has the willingness and capacity to provide primary child care. This can include being a stay-at-home mother, being actively involved in the child’s schooling, and acting as the primary disciplinarian. Courts may also look to see which parent contributes more to the child’s social needs, such as driving them to and from sport’s practices. If one parent is unwilling or unable to provide this type of care for the child, then the court will not weigh this factor in their favor. This can obviously result from a number of aspects about a parent’s life, most notably employment demands.

One misconception that many people read into this factor is that it will always clearly favor one parent over the other. Many times, courts find that this factor favors neither parent, because both express a desire and willingness to provide for their child. In this situation, a court would turn to other factors to decide the custody of the child. Another worry that clients seem to have about this factor is the strength of the words “ability” and “willingness.” Being deemed to not have the ability or willingness to raise child will surely have a profound effect on a parent, however all is not lost when this occurs.

Many incorrectly believe that this factor is the main decision regarding a chancellor’s judgment of who the better parent is to raise the child or children involved. It is not. Although an important factor, the determination of which (if either) parent has the best parenting skills is just one of several factors that the court weighs in a custody case. If you or any one you may know has a question, or is unsure about the law pertaining to custody, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole. Our office can answer any question that arises about these factors that you may have, and can help you through this unpleasant time. Please continue to follow this series as we explore and explain more of the Albright factors.

Winning and Losing a Custody Case

Friday, December 29th, 2017

The smallest events can have a large significance on the outcome of a situation. A custody lawsuit is no different, as the testimony of one witness or the smallest behavior by a party can be the deciding factor in who gets custody of a child. Our office has had many cases hinge on a seemingly insignificant occurrence or detail. Our office wants our current and future clients to know the impact that things can have on their custody hearing, and what they can do to influence the outcome.

Custody cases are a naturally volatile process, and when you introduce the emotions and concerns that these cases raise, they become even more so. One part that may be hard on the parties is a temporary visitation and custody order that the court puts in place until a trial on the case is heard. Having contact with the other person for exchange of a minor child for visitation can be a tough thing for people to go through, as many former romantic partners harbor some sort of ill will toward each other. Mississippi Courts have held that interference in a parent’s visitation schedule may amount to a material change in circumstances in extreme cases. Ash v. Ash, 622 So.2d 1264, (Miss. 1993). Though it may be difficult, the best thing is to adhere to the court’s order as closely as possible. Court orders are not suggestions, and keeping in line with that order will only help your case.

Another common thing we see in our office is disparagement of one parent by the other. Mississippi courts have held held that, if extreme enough, parental alienation or disparagement can amount to a material change in circumstances that can be enough to award custody to the non-offending parent. Potter v. Greene, 973 So.2d 291, 293 (Miss. Ct. App. 2008). It is natural to want to make your case to both the Court and your child, however that energy is better spent showing the child why they should live with you, and not just why they shouldn’t live with their other parent. These remarks can be very damaging to the relationship between the child and the other parent, as well as to the child themselves.

There is simply no way around it: custody lawsuits are tough. They combine they already stressful process of a lawsuit with decisions that will impact a family’s life for the foreseeable future. Although both parties to these cases care about the welfare of the child, too often their disdain for each other shines brighter than that concern. Our advice is to be careful of your conduct during a custody lawsuit. This is simple advice that when combined with the highly emotional nature of these cases can become difficult to keep in perspective. The other side is just as invested as you are, and if they believe reporting your behavior to the court will help their case, then they will. If you have questions about what to do outside of the courtroom in your custody case, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole, and we will help you in any way we can.

Questions for Your Attorney? Ask Them!

Thursday, December 21st, 2017

A lawsuit can be a confusing process for someone who has never been involved in one. They involve a language totally different than the everyday vocabulary of most people. Attorneys usually expect questions from clients because of the large amounts of questions they themselves had at the outset of their career. Divorce lawsuits are especially stressful, as they delve deep into some of the most well-guarded areas of a person’s life. Knowing what questions to ask your attorney can help very much in cutting that stress down, and to help you make sure your case is in good hands. Here are some examples of questions you should be discussing with your attorney.

Question #1: Have you issued discovery, and what did that discovery request?

Discovery is the part of the lawsuit where attorneys send requests for information to the opposing side to be answered. This often involves interrogatories, which are questions about the case to be answered, and requests for production of documents that may be used as evidence at trial. Discovery is an extremely important part of a lawsuit, as it gives a party the time to possibly object to some requests and to carefully build their case. Asking about the issuance and substance of discovery is a way for you to make sure that the attorney you hired is taking the right steps to build your case.

Question #2: What was included in the pleading?

Pleadings are how you ask the court for the relief you want, and therefore should be done with care and should include every remedy possible. For example, there are twelve grounds for divorce in Mississippi. Asking questions about those grounds can help your attorney know what grounds you may have, which will therefore help in crafting the best pleading possible for your case. It’s your story, so help your attorney tell it.

Question #3: What witnesses should I call to help my case?

The answer to this question from an attorney will most likely be “it depends.” Witnesses may testify to things they have personally seen or heard as well as things told to them. You know better than anyone the people in your life who may be able to help present your case, and your attorney’s past experience may help in discovering other potential witnesses as well. One witness’s testimony can be a huge difference-maker in a domestic case.

Question #4: What documentary evidence should I produce?

One question our office receives from clients almost without exception is “What do you need from me?” This often depends on what the other side asks you to produce. In domestic litigation, common documents requested involve finances and contact between a party and their spouse or child. Your attorney should know what document requests you can object to and which ones you will most likely need to produce to the opposing side. These documents will be the foundation of your case, and you should ask your attorney their plan for building that foundation.

Question #5: What things specific to my case can we ask the court to order?

Every situation in domestic litigation is different, as the experiences, wants and needs of different families intersect in each case. You should be asking your attorney what you could possibly ask the court to order that helps you in your situation. The attorney’s role in this is twofold: the attorney should have a basic idea of what the court will or won’t order while also offering a less emotional presence making the request. When a decision affects your family, you want to make sure it is the right one.

Your attorney’s role in your lawsuit is to help you navigate the rules and procedures of a lawsuit, and asking questions can help you give your attorney all the help they need in building your case, as well as making sure your attorney is properly representing you. Lawyers expect those questions, so ask them! Many lawyers will either know the answer, or admit that they don’t and will find you the answer. In lawsuits, the right questions can be the difference between a good result or a bad one. If you have questions about your domestic case, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole. We will be glad to help you in any way possible.

Hindsight is 20/20: Lessons From an Attorney Divorcee’

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

I am currently an attorney in the state of Alabama and have known Matthew Poole since 2003 during our time with the Mississippi Attorney General’s Office. Following is a first hand experience that is significant when confronted with divorce.

The old saying “hindsight is 20/20” is certainly an overused cliché, but could not be more fitting to describe my experience with divorce.  I learned some difficult lessons over the course of what I describe as my “4 year divorce” and my goal is to provide you with a map to avoid the same mistakes I made. You may hear that no divorce is the same, but most divorcees face many of the same pitfalls.  If my open and honest discussion helps just one other dad avoid four years of trials and tribulations, then this blog will be a success. If one child benefits from the message about the importance of co-parenting, this is a pure success.

To paraphrase a wise saying, “you can’t know where you are going until you know where you have been.”  Four years of journaling my divorce provided me the unique opportunity to reflect on where I was emotionally at each step of my divorce.  My journal is a snapshot of my thought process at the very moments I made each mistake in my divorce and would certainly be the “knowing where I was” and having the opportunity to see it in hindsight gives me the clarity I need to “know where I am going.”

Wrong turns in divorce don’t start at the moment the divorce is finalized; not even close.  Vital decisions are made in the pre-divorce period that will carry long-lasting implications and results in newly divorced fathers facing nearly insurmountable odds of being the best dad they can be.  There comes a point in the pre-divorce process that the inevitability of divorce sets in.  For me, this crucial point came after months, or more realistically years, of efforts to keep my family together.  I was physically exhausted, emotionally drained, and filled with anxiety about the unknown.  That is when I made not just the first wrong turn, but THE wrong turn that set me on a path that took me fours years to begin to correct.  I have a name for it. I call it my moment of “white flag surrender.”

Waiving the proverbial white flag was my way of doing what I thought was best for my children.  Remember, if you are in unfamiliar territory and you are exhausted and desperate, you will not make the best decisions for your family.  I agreed to give my ex-wife everything and I mean everything.  My wife got the kids, house, condo, cars, bank accounts, and even family heirlooms.  I walked away with my clothes. I made the mistake of representing myself, and that is something even the finest lawyer should avoid.

My first wrong pre-divorce decision directly resulted in my starting my new life as a single dad unable to support my kids in the way they needed. If you have yet to hear your attorney or judge use the phrase “best interest of the child,” you soon will.  Every decision made during the entire pre-divorce and divorce processes should be made through the lens of what is in the best interest of your child.  That is to say, while contemplating decisions you face, you must ask first “what is in the best interest of the child?” Having two emotionally and financially secure parents is always in the best interest of your children, and by doing what I thought best. I wrecked myself financially and then emotionally, thus, leaving my children with less than 2 reliable parents.  

Navigating the divorce process was stressful, but by putting myself in a position of weakness (i.e. impatience) during my pre-divorce surrender, I fared much worse in the final divorce decree (more on that in later blog entries).  Every hasty decision (there were many!) I made was in the interests of receiving finality instead of with the realization that the court’s order would be in place barring monumental litigation.

Divorcee Life-lesson One:

Pre-divorce is not the time to throw in the towel to all of your ex’s desires and demands, even if you think this might be what is best for the kids.  Remember, two financially strong and emotionally stable parents are what is ultimately in the best interest of the kids. Pre-divorce is tough. The whole process is foreign to you.  You will be scared.  You will be emotionally drained.  You just want the pain and discomfort for everyone to end.  Believe me, I know.  But you will only make matters much worse for your kids, your ex and yourself if you do not position yourself to exit your marriage as financially secure as you can justly make it for yourself. If you resist the urge to surrender (and dang it is a strong urge), you will be a better single father, a better ex-husband, and ultimately, that is all that matter to your children.      

As you set out on your new journey as a single dad, you will need to prepare yourself for the stresses that await you throughout the divorce process. It is pivotal that you fight the urge to waive that white flag before you ever get started. Do not set out on this path alone and don’t be ashamed to ask someone to be a part of your support network. Use every tool you have to remain focused on the best interest of the kids while fighting that urge to throw in the towel. If you will heed this advice you can come out the other side of your divorce much better prepared to take care of your kids while avoiding the four-year journey I took down the wrong path filled with pitfalls disappointment and heartache.

If you are contemplating a divorce, whether it be high-asset based or the primary concern is that of your child’s well-being, The Law Office of Matthew Poole has the experience and expertise to assist you in making one of the most crucial decisions of your life. Don’t attempt going it alone, even if you are an attorney.

Consent Judgments in Child Custody

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

One common misconception about family law in the state of Mississippi is the way that agreements regarding child custody operate. In cases involving child custody, consent judgments may be entered into by parties to best create a custody arrangement for that child.

A consent judgment is a contract of the parties entered upon the records of a court of competent jurisdiction with its sanction and approval. That consent must be present when any order is entered, and the order is considered void if either party withdraws that consent before the judgment is entered. If a party believes that the consent judgment is invalid, they bear the burden of proof in showing that invalidity to the court. Consent judgments allow parents in Mississippi to work out a custody schedule for their child with a lower level of confrontation, stress, and money than in litigation.

We understand that often parties will be tempted to not involve the court system in child custody matters, often to avoid involving the minor child in a lengthy and stressful process. However, as appealing this may seem in the beginning, it is not a good practice to follow. If one party refuses the other party time with the child, there is no court order that a party can seek to have enforced. This is the largest reason that consent judgments should be considered from the outset of a child custody matter. It protects the rights of parents to spend time with their minor children, and it can ease the hardship on the minor child when one parent attempts to have them “pick sides.”

Children are not goods; they cannot be bartered for, and their custody should be taken seriously by all parties involved. Consent judgments in cases involving child custody are often the preferred route for everyone involved, and if done properly they can minimize the stress that these cases have on the parents, the lawyers, and most importantly, the child or children. If you or anyone you know has a question about judgments involving child custody, please contact the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole at 601-573-7429.