Mississippi Custody Factor 4: Employment of the Parent

In tune with our last post, Mississippi Courts rightfully use many factors in determining the custody of a minor child. The employment of the parent is a crucial factor in the Albright analysis that a chancellor will weigh in determining which parent will be awarded custody, and will also play a part in the creation of a visitation schedule between the parent and child(ren). This factor may seem as though the court looks just to which parent has the higher-paying job or career. The court’s analysis, however, dives deeper into the responsibilities of each of the parents’ employment.

Standard visitation is every other weekend, 4 weeks in the summer, and 10 days at Christmas time, with other holiday visitation scattered throughout the year. Obviously, careers such as offshore workers, nurses, military, and others that demand large blocks of time will most likely not allow this schedule to be workable. Understandably, this is a concern we often hear in our office, as many Mississippians are employed in professions such as these. The client hears “since you don’t have time to exercise your visitation, you don’t get it at all.” This is absolutely not the case, as any chancellor in Mississippi would be gravely mistaken to not consider that work schedule regarding visitation.

Many people also think that the parent with the higher-paying career is perceived to be better suited to provide for the child, however this concern is ill-placed, as support is only one facet of this factor. Many times, the court looks to the parents’ work schedule and time at work to determine whether their work life is conducive to being involved with the child’s school and social life. Often, a parent whose employment schedule and responsibilities align with the child’s school and social schedule will weigh more favorably than just a job with a higher income. For example, a parent with a job that starts at 8:30 a.m. until 3:00 p.m., who has time to drop off and pick up their child at school, may be considered more beneficial to that child than a parent with earlier hours and higher pay.

Although the nature of a parents’ employment and the responsibilities of that employment is an important factor for a chancellor to consider, it is but one factor among many that the court must weigh in awarding custody. Though not dispositive, a parents’ work hours and schedule weighs in favor of that parent when that schedule best cooperates with the needs of the child.

This factor of a child custody decision is one that clients often have the most questions about, because their employment usually relates to support issues. However, the employment of a parent is also a huge factor in custody and visitation. A lot of professions have schedules that simply do not allow standard visitation to work, and parents will not be punished for having a schedule like that. If you have any questions about your employment in relation to a child custody case or know anyone who may have questions about a child custody case, please call the law offices of Matthew S. Poole. We are pleased to assist you in this turbulent time. Feel free to keep following this series on the Albright factors.

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