Archive for the ‘Three Common Mistakes When Dealing with the Guardian Ad Litem Assigned to Your Mississippi Child Custody Case.’ Category

Three Common Mistakes When Dealing with the Guardian Ad Litem Assigned to Your Mississippi Child Custody Case

Friday, November 18th, 2016

First of all, it’s important to understand the basic role of a guardian ad litem in a child custody matter (a.k.a. child custody lawsuit).  If a guardian ad litem has been appointed by a Mississippi Chancellor (often referred to as a Chancery Court Judge) to investigate facts that are relevant to your custody case and make a recommendation to the court as to what they believe is in the best interests of a child, there are three common mistakes that people can and will make that can adversely impact the result and report of the guardian ad litem.   It is important to know that guardian ad litem is a latin term for “guardian at law”.  These guardians are generally appointed by the court in order to perform a fact finding expedition and make a recommendation as to the placement of physical and legal custody of a minor child or children.  It is also crucial to note that the court does not have to follow the findings of the guardian ad litem, although deviations from the general recommendations of the guardian are rare and have to be supported by substantial evidence as presented to the court.

The most common mistakes we see in dealing with our client’s involvement with guardians ad litem are as follows; not sufficiently communicating with the guardian ad litem as to the issues that need to be investigated.  For instance, we have clients that have three or four (or sometimes half-a-dozen) issues that they wish to be investigated by the guardian ad litem, but they only communicate those to us—they expect all communication to go through their lawyer (which is not unreasonable, but impractical at best).  It is important that the client take an active role in speaking with the guardian in order to facilitate the investigation and keep costs down, and it is also important that the client be able to shine a light on all of the issues that they believe are relevant to the best interests of the minor child.  It is important to stay abreast of the guardian ad litem’s progress in their investigation and the various things (i.e. factual issues relevant to custody) that they are considering in making in a recommendation to the court.

It is also important, when possible, to communicate with the guardian ad litem in writing so that there will be a substantial, provable record as to the issues that you wish to be investigated.  It is crucial to know that the more issues and the more complex issues that exist, the guardian’s investigation will have to be more extensive and often this will require that you incur additional cost due to that additional work required in performing the investigation.  

Another very common mistake we see clients make is disparaging their spouse or ex to the guardian ad litem.  This is not well-founded, and we always advise against this ill-advised conduct.  Put simply, it does not cast the disparaging parent in a positive light.  If you have criticisms of your ex’s conduct as it relates to what is best for your child or children, then those issues need to be dealt with in a mature, rational way.

It is important though that the thrust of your argument doesn’t consist of disparaging or demeaning or name calling of your ex-spouse or your ex-girlfriend or ex-boyfriend.  The child’s parent deserves respect regardless of the behaviors that you complain of.  But be objective, and make sure your focus is on what is best for your child or children, not winning the moral high ground.   Courts and domestic attorneys are very familiar in dealing with situations where the motive is not the protection of the child or children, but moral vindication—feeling that you “won”.  The long and short of dealing with your custody matter is essentially taking the objective approach; don’t be angry, don’t  be upset, don’t be overly emotional, just lay the bare groundwork  for the issues that you believe are important that the guardian ad litem consider in making in making their custody recommendation to Chancery Court.  Trust their expertise.  

The next common mistake that we see is failing to have a clear educational plan or path for your minor child or children.  You have to be engaged with your minor child in order to demonstrate to the guardian ad litem that you are the parent that is more involved in facilitating that child’s education and will continue to do so in the future.  It is not necessarily important that you have a college plan for a five year old, however it is important to actively monitor your child’s progress and address issues and short- comings where you are able to make a positive impact and help the child improve in their educational  performance.  It is also crucial to consider having a plan in place for children above seventh grade for their ultimate placement in college and potential course of study.  It is not say that you must have their entire future planned out, but addressing your child’s strengths and weaknesses in the classroom bit-by- bit is important, and will show the guardian ad litem demonstrably that you are the parent with the best ability to effectuate your child’s best interest and goals.  Most importantly, it shows that you care.

If you have a question about this article or would like to share your thoughts, please feel free to contact us at The Law Office of Matthew Poole (601) 573-7429 or matthewspoole@gmail.com.  We are best equipped to assess your situation and give you some practical advice on steps you can take to increase your odds on gaining custody of your child or children.