Archive for the ‘Annulments: What They Are and What They Aren’t’ Category

Annulments: What They Are and What They Aren’t

Monday, April 9th, 2018

An annulment is an interesting way to sever a relationship that may resemble a divorce in some regards, but is actually quite different. Our office receives many calls asking how to get an annulment, when maybe that person only has divorce to look to for relief. While a divorce severs a valid marriage, an annulment states that the marriage in question was never valid for a reason that existed at the time of the marriage. Annulments can be difficult to obtain, as there are only limited circumstances in which a Mississippi court will grant one. Time plays a factor as well, as a suit for an annulment must be brought within 6 months after the ground for annulment is or should be discovered.

Mississippi law states that a marriage is deemed valid if there is solemnization (a ceremony) and a proper license. When two people decide quickly to get married without any input or help from others, these are easy things to gloss over, especially in the rush and excitement of saying “I do.” A “marriage” with only one of these requirements met will not meet Mississippi’s standards, and therefore a marriage was never legally formed.

Of course, certain marriage even with these requirements met may not be considered valid under any circumstances, as in the case of bigamy or incest to a certain degree, and does not have to be brought within 6 months of the formation of the “marriage.” Dissolving a marriage involving either of those grounds simply requires a petition to the proper court by either of the parties along with sufficient proof. The other grounds for annulment in Mississippi are incurable impotency, adjudicated mental illness or incompetence of one or both of the parties, the parties being too young, pregnancy of the wife by another person if the husband did not know of the pregnancy, or where a party’s consent to the marriage was achieved through force or fraud. In other words, informed consent is paramount to any marriage.

As you can see from the limited grounds for annulment in Mississippi, there are many situations where an annulment is not available to the parties, and they will have to pursue a divorce to legally terminate their relationship. A common misconception that we hear is that because a marriage was short, then the parties can get an annulment instead of a divorce. While marriages that may be properly annulled by Mississippi courts are often short, the length of the marriage by itself is not enough for an annulment.

Annulments are an interesting creature of domestic relations law and can be confusing and difficult to pursue. If you believe you may have a ground for an annulment that can help you avoid a long and costly divorce, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole. We have experience in making the determination as to whether a marriage can be rendered moot and can be considered to have never existed, whether an annulment is a possible remedy, or whether divorce is the only avenue.