Archive for the ‘And There Were Still Twelve – Domestic Violence and Divorce Grounds in Mississippi’ Category

And There Were Still Twelve – Domestic Violence and Divorce Grounds in Mississippi

Sunday, March 5th, 2017

Recently, the Mississippi Legislature again voted against a bill that would make domestic violence the thirteenth ground for divorce in Mississippi. As to be expected, there has been large public backlash around the state regarding this decision. Much of this criticism seems to be directed at the legislature’s seeming insensitivity to the seriousness of domestic violence. While our office condemns domestic violence in every form, it is important for Mississippians to know the effects of this decision on a divorce case in the state.

There are twelve grounds for divorce in Mississippi, which are listed elsewhere on our website for your viewing. Our concern today is the ground of habitual cruel and inhuman treatment, which is the ground most likely to be at the front of a divorce where domestic violence is occurring. While domestic violence is still not explicitly a part of Mississippi divorce grounds, cruel and inhuman treatment allows abuse to be addressed by courts in the state. The phrase is vague, and has been examined through many different lenses throughout the years.

Marriage is, for lack of a better word, hard. Arguments and unpleasantness are simply parts of both marriage and life. Therefore, habitual cruel and inhuman treatment must extend beyond rudeness, unkindness, or mere incompatibility. Although the word “habitual” indicates that this behavior must be continuous or systematic, Mississippi courts have held that a single instance can provide grounds for a divorce. Kumar v. Kumar, 976 So.2d 957, 961 (Miss. Ct. App. 2008). Physical violence or even a threat of it isn’t required to show proof of cruel and inhuman treatment. Cruel and inhuman treatment can also take the form of emotional abuse, which can later lead to actual violence.

The case of Harmon v. Harmon, 141 So. 3d 37 (Miss. Ct. App. 2014) showcases less severe grounds enabling a divorce in Mississippi. In that case, a wife testified that her husband of five years regularly accused her of adultery, called her derogatory names, followed her on breaks from work, and appeared often at her place of work. Her daughter and co-workers testified to her agitated manner following his actions, and that she was experiencing suicidal thoughts as well as murderous thoughts about her husband. The husband was also a compulsive gambler. The court of appeals affirmed the grant of divorce based on habitual cruelty. This case shows that grounds much less severe than physical domestic violence can effectuate a divorce in Mississippi, and that habitual cruel and inhuman treatment is an effective ground for divorce under even minimally violent or abusive circumstances.

While the Legislature’s decision is disappointing, the twelve current grounds for divorce in Mississippi sufficiently allow for a divorce to be granted. The Legislature declining to add domestic violence as a thirteenth ground does not mean that occurrences of domestic violence cannot provide a ground for a divorce. The current statutes provide grounds for divorce in abusive scenarios, albeit under a different label. It is also important to also note that Constructive Desertion can be recognized as ground for divorce when the conduct of one spouse is subjectively ruining the ability to maintain a normal, healthy marriage.

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, our office encourages you to seek help, and to feel confident in pursuing a divorce because of that violence. Despite the number of grounds staying at twelve, Mississippians should feel confident in the professionals of the legal system, and their ability to realize when domestic violence entitles a person to a divorce.

By Kenneth Davis, J.D. Candidate 2017.  Law Clerk to Matthew Poole.