Archive for May, 2018

Importance of a Father in the Home

Saturday, May 12th, 2018

Maintaining the family unit should be the number one goal of any mother and father. Even when going through a divorce, it is essential that both parents are just as involved in their child’s life as they possible can be. However, with divorce ever on the rise in the United States, an all too common consequence of parent’s separating can be an absence of the father in the home. This can mean a great deal of adversity for the children later on in life. Be it an increased risk of poverty or a higher chance of incarceration, living without a father puts a child’s life squarely at risk for all manner of difficulty.

Since 1960, the percentage of children living in two-parent homes has decreased dramatically from 88% down to 66%. This drop has been caused by many factors, but the most prevalent one is the rise in divorce. Across the nation, married couples are calling it quits and their children are stuck in the middle. Unfortunately, this increase in divorce has made some dads pack up permanently, leaving their ex-wife with the kids, and their kids without a father-figure. This can have an indescribable effect on the life of a child.

According to the Census Bureau, there are 24 million children in the United States, and one out of three of them live without their biological father in the home. Compared to children who live with both parents, these children are four times more likely to live in poverty, and two times more likely to drop out of high school. Combine these statistics with the poverty income level in the U.S. only being $12,140.00 a year, a child living in a single parent, fatherless home has to escape becoming another statistic just to overcome the odds already stacked against them.

Risks of poverty and lack of education aside, there is a darker and more horrifying concern of growing up without a father. One of the more striking statistics provided by the Census Bureau shows that 63% of youth suicides in the United States are performed by children of single-parent homes. This is an astonishing number. To put this data a different way, one of the only single identifying metrics that connects two thirds of all children from around the country that commit suicide is the fact that they are raised in a single-parent home. This alone shows the importance of why maintaining a two-parent household is integral in a child’s life.

Going through a divorce can be the toughest thing someone has to go through. Although most everyone would rather not split up their own family, it is often not that simple. When mom and dad cannot work it out, or even refuse to work it out, the child suffers. Custody battles can be the same way. When one parent refuses to let mom or dad be a part of their kid’s lives, it hurts the child most of all. If you want to be a part of their child’s life, but are struggling because of divorce, custody, or your spouse is refusing your rights as a parent, please do not hesitate to call us. The Law Office of Matthew S. Poole is well-seasoned to handle these types of situations and we would be happy to help.

Written by J. Tyler Cox, J.D., Class of 2018

Finances In A Divorce

Monday, May 7th, 2018

A person’s financial situation has more influence over day-to-day life than almost any other aspect. Finances influence our ability to enjoy certain luxuries that life brings. Money is also a very private subject. Almost universally, it is considered rude to inquire about someone’s finances in a social setting, and also viewed as arrogant to brag about money. Therefore, when a prospective client comes to our office seeking to initiate or defend a domestic lawsuit, they are often surprised at the level of financial disclosure that comes with that proceeding.

Finances indicate more than personal wealth. They are a good indicator of a person’s ability to hold down a job, ably manage their finances, and to provide security for their families. Directing your finances in a sensible way shows the court a certain level of maturity. Money is hard to earn, and easy to spend. In domestic litigation, especially when children are involved, courts take into consideration how the litigants have been able to soundly oversee their earnings.

A parent’s finances are a factor in child custody cases, and the financial situation of the parents is even included among the Albright factors that chancellors use in making a child custody determination. You can view an earlier post on our website about that factor as well as the other Albright factors through our website’s blog search function. This does not mean that chancellors will simply look at which parent makes the most money and award custody to that parent. It is but one factor to show that the person seeking custody is able to provide for the child as they need and deserve.

Income also plays a large part in the awarding of alimony or separate maintenance. If one spouse in a divorce makes much more money and the other party needs some financial assistance, courts will take that into consideration when deciding whether or not to avoid alimony.

One of the most important documents in domestic litigation is the 8.05 Financial Declaration, named for the Uniform Chancery Rule that requires certain financial disclosures to be made. This document lists a person’s income, assets, and liabilities. Having an ex-spouse be able to see that information can make clients uncomfortable, but they are important declarations to make in these cases. Chancery courts, which handle domestic matters, are courts of equity. This means that chancery courts attempt to resolve disputes in a way that is fair to both litigants and that avoids unjustly enriching one party over the other. These rules regarding financial disclosures can be a friend to those who follow them, and a foe to those who don’t.

Our office understands the uneasiness that comes with giving out financial information, but we also have the experience to know that following these rules can only help the court look favorably upon a party. For a person involved in domestic litigation, being able to show the capability to control their finances will go a long way in achieving whatever goal that person wishes to reach. If you or someone you know has a question about the financial reporting involved in a lawsuit, call the Law Office of Matthew S. Poole. We will be happy to lend our knowledge to give you a response that is the truth, and to help you navigate any domestic legal issue you may have.

Matthew Poole is a Jackson, Mississippi domestic attorney who specializes in family litigation. He was admitted to practice in 2004.

Parental Alienation: Why You Should Act Fast

Thursday, May 3rd, 2018

Pretty regularly at our office, we unfortunately have child custody cases where one parent continually makes derogatory remarks about the other parent in front of their child. This is one of the worst things a parent can do when wanting to obtain custody, especially when the child is not old enough to legally have a preference with which parent he/she would rather live with. What many parents do not realize is that a parent has an inherent duty to foster and facilitate the relationship between their child and that child’s other parent. Disparaging the other parent can not only hurt their case in the eyes of a chancellor, but it can also adversely affect the child. From a chancellor’s perspective, belittling the other parent in an effort to negatively impact the child’s relationship with them is wholly improper and unacceptable.

When the “brainwashing” of a child by one parent gets so bad that it manipulates the child into disliking or not wanting a relationship with the other parent, there is more than likely a case of parental alienation. Parental alienation is a term used by child custody lawyers and child psychologists alike to describe what happens in situations where a parent has made conscious efforts, by negative words or actions, to upset their child’s relationship with the other parent. An example of this would be where a mother has spoken badly about a father, made derogatory remarks about him, or even lied about him to the child, all in order to alter that child’s feelings towards his dad, so that the child would not want to live with him.

Other examples of behaviors that can cause parental alienation include one parent discussing details of the parent’s relationship, scheduling the child’s activities during the other parent’s visitation time, not informing the other parent the times of those activities in order for them not to attend, denying the other parent important school and medical records, and giving the child ultimatums encouraging them to pick one parent over the other. This type of behavior has major consequences, and if not addressed as soon as possible, can permanently destroy a child’s relationship with their parent. A child’s mind is very susceptible, especially to a person that they instinctively trust – as they would a parent. Prolonged exposure to this type of influence deteriorates little by little any chance of a relationship they might have had with one of their mother or father.

In years past, parental alienation issues could only be brought up when there was a non-disparagement clause in the custody order. This prevented parental alienation from being any more than a contempt issue. Now, however, chancellors in Mississippi consider disparagement through the parenting-skills factor under Albright. With disparagement now being a consideration in Albright, it constitutes a material change sufficient for modification of custody.

Isolating a parent from their child is serious, and in the end, it does more damage to the child than it does to the other parent. To put it plainly, parental alienation is a form of child abuse. Chancellors know this, that is why any hard evidence that a mother or father is molding their child’s emotions negatively toward the other is met with extreme prejudice. Absent neglect and endangerment, nothing can kill a parent’s chances of being awarded custody more than harmfully reshaping their child’s relationship with their mom or dad. If you believe that this is happening to you, or someone you may know, please give us a call. We have the expertise to handle parental alienation cases, and any of your child custody needs.

Matthew Poole is a Jackson, Mississippi domestic attorney who specializes in family litigation. He was admitted to practice in 2004.